The first female navy sailor who made history leading the queens gun carriage




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  • Queen Elizabeth II’s state funeral was held at Westminster Abbey yesterday, eleven days after Buckingham Palace announced the sad news of her passing on Thursday 8th September.

    The country has been in an official period of mourning since the announcement, and political figures and royals from across the world attended the service in London while millions watched the televised service from around the world.

    Members of the royal family paid tribute to the late monarch by wearing sentimental pieces of jewellery, with the Princess of Wales Kate Middleton wearing an historical necklace from the Queen’s collection, and the Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle wore a pair of pearl and diamond earrings that Her Majesty gifted her ahead of their first official engagement together in 2018.

    Princess Charlotte also honoured her great-grandmother with a horseshoe brooch, a sweet nod to their love of horses.

    The funeral was planned meticulously, and every detail from the salutes to the flowers had a heartfelt meaning behind it.

    More than 1,000 sailors and royal marines trained to take part in the honourable role. Following tradition, Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin was transported by a 123-year-old gun carriage weighing 5,600 pounds, and it was towed by 98 Royal Navy sailors – fifteen of which were women.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Warrant Officer Class 2 El-Leigh Neal, one of the sailors, told the Telegraph that she was chosen for her ‘mixture of strength’, as well as to honour the late Queen.

    She said: “I think everyone in the military – she was our boss – so everyone does feel that special connection with her.”

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    She added that she ‘believed there were 15 women pulling the carriage’, which she considered an honour and privilege, as ‘no females have actually pulled the gun carriage yet.’

    A highly emotional day for all those watching, it is thought that over 7 billion people tuned into watch the funeral take place.

    Our thoughts are with the royal family during this difficult time.



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